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Ten years after the financial crisis and Western democracies are still drowning in mountains of financial debt, both public and private. The political economy of debt has a range of normative implications for contemporary democracies as they confront rising inequality, populist movements, failures of elite accountability, and the complex governance challenges associated with transnational structures like the EU.

Detail Summary
Date 11 December 2019
Time 10:45 - 17:00
Location Roeterseilandcampus - building B/C/D (entrance B/C)
Room Political Science Common Room B9.23

This mini-conference will deploy the tools of “applied political theory” to explore the politics of debt at the intersection of normative ethics and empirical political science in a European context.

Programme

10:45:                 Welcome and Introductions

11:00 - 12:00:    Jens van’t Klooster (KU Leuven) 

Global banking regulation, justice and the blind spots of Basel III

12:00 - 13:30:    Lunch

13:30 - 14:30:    Steven Klein (University of Florida, American Academy Berlin)

Keynote Paper: The Power of Money: Towards a Democratic Theory of Finance

14:30 - 14:45:    Coffee Break

14:45 - 15:45:    Josette Daemen (Leiden University)

Could Security Be a Metric of Distributive Justice?

15:45 - 16:00:    Coffee Break

16:00 - 17:00:    Janosch Prinz (Maastricht University) and Enzo Rossi (University of Amsterdam)

Financial Power and Democratic Legitimacy: How to Think Realistically About Public Debt

17:00                   Drinks (Crea)

 

REGISTER

Roeterseilandcampus - building B/C/D (entrance B/C)
Roeterseilandcampus - building B/C/D (entrance B/C)

Room Political Science Common Room B9.23

Nieuwe Achtergracht 166
1018 WV Amsterdam